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Inspiring CSM Short Course tutor Pascal Anson fronts the BBC Big Painting Challenge!

February 16, 2017 in courses, Meet our tutors

Central Saint Martins Short Course Interior Design tutor Pascal Anson is currently on our screens as a mentor on The Big Painting Challenge!

Pascal will be teaching our Interior Design Portfolio course this coming July.  For more information please visit the CSM Short Courses website.

Catch Pascal on your TV screens at 6pm on Sunday’s on BBC1!

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Ideas Are Your Only Currency

January 30, 2017 in courses, Meet our tutors

We are proud to announce the new book by Central Saint Martins short courses tutor Rod Judkins Ideas Are Your Only Currency. We chat to Rod about how his Short Course, 100 Design Projects, provided inspiration for the book and ask that burning question, can non-creatives really become creative?

You’re the author of The Art of Creative Thinking and Change your Mind: 57 ways to unlock your creative self. What was the inspiration behind your new book Ideas Are Your Only Currency, and how does it follow on from your two previous titles?

The inspiration for Ideas Are Your Only Currency was my Central Saint Martins short course called 100 Design Projects. Over many years of teaching art and design at UAL, I noticed the students that lasted and prospered after they left were the ‘ideas’ students. Because culture changes so rapidly, the ‘ideas’ students were able to adapt quickly. The students who relied on a skill often found themselves washed up when technology rendered that skill redundant. So I tried to help students become good at generating ideas. I found the best way to do that was by doing two things. To set them conceptual projects that stretched their minds and forced them to think of ideas rather than create designs that looked attractive. Secondly, to set a lot of projects. Thinking of many ideas is the best training for getting ideas.

Ideas Are Your Only Currency by Rod Judkins

Ideas Are Your Only Currency by Rod Judkins

My previous books equipped the reader with specific techniques and methods to think creatively and solve design problems.  I examined creative thinkers from art and design but also literature music and science. I explained the process they used to get ideas. Then I demonstrated to the reader how they could use them in whatever field they worked in.

The Art of Creative Thinking by Rod Judkins

The Art of Creative Thinking by Rod Judkins

You’ve been teaching the highly popular short courses 100 Design Projects and 100 Drawing Projects at Central Saint Martins for a number of years now. How have they evolved over the years?

If a project does not produce exciting work, next time I run the course I either alter it or delete it and add a better project. Over the years, I’ve been able to develop all the projects on the course to the highest standard. They are very different courses. 100 Design Projects focuses on ideas and how to get them. 100 Drawing Projects concentrates on exploring the potential of every conceivable medium and how to use them to improve your drawing ability.

Do you cover specific elements of the book in your 100 Design Projects course? If so, which course focuses on which elements? (i.e., I loved chapter 4, so maybe I can book on…)

A chapter of Ideas Are Your Only Currency focuses on technology – how we make it but it also alters and therefore makes us. So in both the book and the course I try to get students to work out how to make sure they use technology rather than let technology use them.

Ideas Are Your Only Currency

Ideas Are Your Only Currency


What’s the most effective ‘first step’ for any aspiring creative out there?

They should work out why they want to be creative. What is it they hope to achieve? Self-expression? Improve the design of cars? When they work out the ‘why,’ the ‘how’ and ‘what’ are easier to establish.

Any advice on how to approach a non-creative career with a bit more creativity?

Because of the success of my books I’ve been invited into places like the Royal Free Hospital where I teach creative thinking to Applied Medical Students. This is a new venture The Royal Free started because they are frustrated that science students have been taught how to learn facts at school but are not creative thinkers. A medical science students needs to be problem solver. A hospital is full of unexpected and unusual situations. That’s where I come in – I help the students to become ideas people who can think of solutions to problems.

Do you think finishing projects is important?

When you first think of an idea it is usually in the form of rough sketch and has energy and life. The more you work on it and refine it the more you can kill that energy. The trick is to develop and idea quickly and maintain that energy.

Where do you go for inspiration?

I get a lot of ideas from students. They introduce me to new topics, new music and new technologies. I meet so many students and they tell me so many things they’ve discovered – they keep me in touch.

What should our visiting students definitely not miss to catch ‘creative London’ in it’s finest?

I’d recommend First Thursdays at the Whitechapel Gallery. On the first Thursday of every month they organize a tour of local galleries. About 150 galleries in east London come together and run free events, exhibitions, talks and private views during a special late opening. They also take you around on a bus – it’s great fun and you learn a lot.

What’s the most important tool for artists? 

I don’t think physical tools are important. If a painter loses his brushes he can replace them with cloth, sponges, etc. Thinking tools are useful because if you get stuck they provide lots of possible alternatives.

Ideas Are Your Only Currency

Ideas Are Your Only Currency

 

Can non-creatives become creative?

They already are. I’ve discovered that, working with scientists in a hospital. They are constantly innovating and inventing new procedures and treatments but they don’t think of themselves as creative, they think of themselves as scientists.

Rod launches Ideas Are Your Only Currency tonight at Daunt Books, Marylebone, London

Book Launch

Rod’s next 100 Design Projects course is in April with further dates throughout the year.  He also teaches, 100 Drawing Projects, Contemporary Collage and Developing Your Creativity. Check the Central Saint Martins Short Course Website for further details.
Follow Rod on Twitter

 

VIDEO ART: AN INTRODUCTION TO MOVING IMAGE PRACTICE

November 3, 2016 in courses, Meet our tutors

Central Saint Martins Short Courses is very pleased to announce a new and exciting weekend course, that will examine Video art: an introduction to moving image practice, this coming December.  Taught by Dr. Azadeh Fatehrad, an artist and curator currently based at the Photography Programme of the Royal College of Art, we chat to Azadeh about Video Art in 2016 and what students can expect from her new course.

Video Art encompasses installations, films, digital media and projections and has been around in these various forms since the 1960s. But where is Video Art in 2016 and what relevance does it have today?

Video art is, in fact, one of the most significant art practices in the contemporary world. I agree that the start of the practice was in the 1960s, when it was primarily single channel video, or was used to reflect on an artist’s process by capturing their studio practice – e.g. Bruce Nauman. However, the medium of moving image has now expanded in diversity, in terms of content, duration and display. By using different editing techniques, filming equipment and displaying facilities, artists have reached one of the most significant levels of image making possible today.

At the same time, with the shrinking physical world that we live in, many contemporary artists find video art more convenient, as it can easily be stored on a hard drive.

VideoArt1

When did you first present yourself as a Video Artist?

It was in 2011 that I installed my first multi-channel video installation in the Chelsea Triangle Space. It was the result of an experimental process in which I shifted from working with physical art (Painting, Sclupture) to time based media.

What inspired you to practice Video art?

Video art presented a new language for me at the time and I was curious to learn more about it. I was fascinated by the combination of sound, image and narrative, and impressed by the length of a video art piece-  the fact that it could form a linear sequence of fragments of an event.

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Currently you are a lecturer based at the Royal College of Art, London and also a visiting lecturer at the Moving Image Department of Brighton University.  How did you make that transition from artist to lecturer?

I found video art more communicative and a more effective artistic tool, but I was not sure yet which particular style would be more suitable for me.

Where should I start and how could I express my ideas in a narrative form? That was when I embarked on extensive research on different video art practices such as documentaries, essay films, poetic diary films, photo-based videos, footage re-visitation, and performance-based videos, among others. I was anxious to find out more about techniques, concepts and the history in parallel. It was a fruitful journey and I realised it could be an important part of art education. For this reason, I prioritised teaching and sharing my findings with groups of art students in Britain such as at the Royal College of Art, as well as abroad at the likes of Konstfack Stockholm.

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What can students expect from your new course Video Art: An Introduction to Moving Image Practice at Central Saint Martins Short Courses?

I have created an abridged version of my video art teachings exclusively for the Central Saint Martins short courses. The sessions would start by looking at the diverse styles of video art practice, referring to examples by artists and practitioners such as Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Chris Marker and Chantal Akerman among others. I believe discussion should be one of the most important parts of the sessions where the group could bring together different perspectives by trying to understand and analyse various video art pieces. We would evaluate the primary elements of each work such as concept, technique and production by referencing existing styles.

Have there been any exhibitions of Video Art in London this year that have particularly impressed you?

The Inoperative Community at Raven Row.

The Inoperative Community Installation Ericka Beckman, You the Better (1983) Photography by Marcus J. Leith

The Inoperative Community Installation
Ericka Beckman, You the Better (1983)
Photography by Marcus J. Leith

The first Video Art: An Introduction to Moving Image Practice weekend course will take place on 18th and 19th March 2017. You can book online via the Short Course website.

The Essential Guide to Business for Artists and Designers

October 14, 2016 in courses, Meet our tutors

Congratulations to CSM Short Course tutor Alison Branagan on the publication of the Second Edition of her book The Essential Guide to Business for Artists and Designers Alison’s popular online course, Self-Promotion for Creatives, is essential for anyone who desires to make a living from art, design, photography, image-making, or other creative activities. There are still a few places remaining on the next session of this course which starts this coming Tuesday 18th October!

Read Alison’s Guest Blog post on the Routes to Business Success here
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